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PREMIUM LEGAL RESOURCES LEGAL FORMS ASK A LAWYER

ANIMO

Lat. Intentionally, purposefully

ANIMUS

The intent; the mind with which a thing is done, as animus. cancellandi, the intention of cancelling; animus farandi, the intention of stealing; animus maiaendi; the intention of remaining; auimus morandi, the intention or purpose of delaying. Whether the act of a man, when in appearance criminal, be so or not, depends upon the intention with which it was done. Vide Intention.

ANIMUS CANCELLANDI

An intention to destroy or cancel. The least tearing of a will by a testator, animus cancellandi, renders it invalid.

ANIMUS FURANDI

crim. law. The intention to steal. In order to comstitute larceny, the thief must take the property anino furandi; but this, is expressed in the definition of larceny by the word felonious. When the taking of property is lawful, although it may afterwards be converted animo furandi to the taker's use, it is not larceny.

ANIMUS MANENDI

The intention of remaining. To acquire a domicil, the party must have his abode in one place, with the intention of remaining there; for without such intention no new domicil can be gained, and the old will not be lost. See Domicile.

ANIMUS RECIPIENDI

The intention of receiving. A man will acquire no title to a thing unless he possesses it with an intention of receiving it for himself; as, if a thing be bailed to a man, he acquires no title.

ANIMUS REVERTENDI

The intention of returning. A man retains his domicil, if he leaves it animo revertendi.

ANIMUS TESTANDI

An intention to make a testament or will. This is required to make a valid will; for whatever form may have been adopted, if there was no animus testandi, there can be no will. An idiot for example, can make no will, because he has no intention.

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