The confirmation of a voidable act; as, for example, when an infant enters into a contract, which is not binding upon him, if, after attaining his full age, he gives his affirmance to it, he will thereafter be bound, as if it had been made when of full age.

To be binding upon the infant, the affirmance must be made after arriving of age, with a full knowledge that it would be void without such confirmation.

An affirmance may be express, that is, where the party declares his determination of fulfilling the contract; but a more acknowledgment is not sufficient. Or it may be implied, as, for example, where an infant mortgaged his land and, at full age, conveyed it, subject to the mortgage.


In the English Court of Exchequer, is a day appointed by the judges of the common pleas, and barons of the exchequer, to be held a few days after the beginning of every term for the general affirmance or reversal of judgments.