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PREMIUM LEGAL RESOURCES LEGAL FORMS ASK A LAWYER

REGISTER

A book containing a record of facts as they occur, kept by public authority; a register of births, marriages and burials.

Although not originally intended for the purposes of evidence, public registers are in general admissible to prove the facts to which they relate.

In Pennsylvania, the registry of births, etc. made by any religious society in the state, is evidence by act of assembly, but it must be proved as at common law. A copy of the register of births and deaths of the Society of Friends in England, proved before the lord mayor of London by an ex parte affidavit, was allowed to be given in evidence to prove the death of a person and a copy of a parish register in Barbadoes, certified to be a true copy by the rector, proved by the oath of a witness, taken before the deputy secretary of the island and notary public, under his hand and seal was held admissible to prove pedigree; the handwriting and office of the secretary being proved.common law. The certificate of registry granted to the person or persons entitled thereto, by the collector of the district, comprehending the port to which any ship or vessel shall belong; more properly, the registry itself.

REGISTER or REGISTRAR

An officer authorized by law to keep a record called a register or registry; as the register for the probate of wills.

REGISTER OF WRITS

This is a book preserved in the English court of chancery, in which were entered, from time to time, all forms of writs once issued.

It was first printed and published in the reign of Henry VIII. This book is still in authority, as containing, in general, an accurate transcript of the forms of all writs as then framed, and as they ought still to be framed in modern practice.

It seems, however, that a variation from the register is not conclusive against the propriety of a form, if other sufficient authority can be adduced to prove its correctness.

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