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SUBSTANTIAL EVIDENCE

Substantial evidence means "more than a mere scintilla. It means such relevant evidence as a reasonable mind might accept as adequate to support a conclusion." Richardson v. Perales, 402 U.S. 389, 401 (1971). [w]here there is such relevant evidence as reasonable minds might accept as adequate to support a conclusion even if it is possible to draw two inconsistent conclusions from the evidence. Landes v. Royal, 833 F.2d 1365, 1371 (9th Cir. 1987).'Substantial' evidence is not synonymous with 'any' evidence. To constitute sufficient substantiality to support the verdict, the evidence must be 'reasonable in nature, credible, and of solid value; it must actually be "substantial" proof of the essentials which the law requires in a particular case.' (Estate of Teed (1952) 112 Cal.App.2d 638, 644; [citations].)" (Kruse v. Bank of America (1988) 202 Cal.App.3d 38, 51-52.) "It means such relevant evidence as a reasonable mind might accept as adequate to support a conclusion. " (Edison Co. v. Labor Board (1938) 305 U.S. 197, 229 [83 L.Ed. 126, 140, 59 S.Ct. 206].) "'Improbable conclusions drawn in favor of a party litigant through the sanction of a jury's verdict will not be sustained where testimony is at variance with physical facts and repugnance is material and self evident.'" (Estate of Teed (1952) 112 Cal.App.2d 638, 644, quoting from an Arkansas case.)

"While substantial evidence may consist of inferences, such inferences must be 'a product of logic and reason' and 'must rest on the evidence' ; inferences that are the result of mere speculation or conjecture cannot support a finding ." (Kuhn v. Department of General Services (1994) 22 Cal.App.4th 1627, 1633.)

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